Convertibles

Convertibles first appeared on the market soon after automobiles were introduced, representing the choice of whether or not to drive with a roof. After all, not everyone wanted to drive in the rain, so cars couldn't be open forever. The earliest roofs were typically made of leather or folding textiles, but they began to fall out of favor in the 1920's when fully-enclosed steel vehicles started to see mass production. At this point, the remaining convertibles were luxury vehicles and ignored by most of the population. Convertibles experienced something of a renaissance after World War II when soldiers stationed in Europe began looking for roadster-like cars back home. Production surged for a few years but fell again in the 1970s as the noise of higher road speeds and improved safety standards made convertibles dubious at best. The proliferation of air conditioning further cemented the convertible's decline. However, newer advancements have helped the convertible return once again. It's still seen as something of a luxury vehicle, but the varying styles have helped to overcome many of the convertible's biggest flaws. The most important part of a convertible is its roof, which generally comes in one of three styles. The most iconic style is the soft top, which is usually black and made of a mixture of materials including polyester, rubber, and canvas. These roofs need to be replaced every few years, but the fact that they can easily fold up and hide in the vehicle means storage isn't a concern. Rear windows are often made of plastic with this type of roof, but some convertibles have found a way to switch to glass. The second type of roof is the detachable hardtop, which can be stored in a garage whenever you don't want to drive with it. This is more popular on older models, but since the top needs to be left at home, it's the least secure model if you're parking elsewhere. The final type of convertible roof is the retractable hardtop, which can hide in the rear of the vehicle thanks to its mechanical systems. These are the safest type of convertible roof, but the added mechanical systems mean they're also the most expensive to install and maintain. Aside from the roof (and any necessary components thereof), convertibles are otherwise identical to the coupe or sedan base they're installed on. Regardless of style, convertibles are still considered luxury vehicles meant for people who enjoy feeling the wind as they drive.

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Highest quality
Listed below are the convertibles that received the 2018 J.D. Power award for highest quality, based on verified owner feedback detailing the number of problems they experienced with their new convertibles during the first 90 days of ownership.
2018 Award Winners
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Most dependable
Listed below are the convertibles that received the 2018 J.D. Power most dependable award based on verified owner feedback detailing the number of problems they experienced with their convertibles throughout three years of ownership. The fewer the number of problems reported, the better.
2018 Award Winners

Dependability ratings and awards are not available for 2018.

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Best performance
Listed below are the convertibles that received the 2018 J.D. Power award for best performance based on verified owner feedback after 90 days of ownership.
2018 Award Winners
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