2014 Seat Quality and Satisfaction Study

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Consumers spend increasingly more time in their vehicles, which requires that the interior not only be functional, but also include comfortable seats. It is critical that manufacturers and suppliers design and provide in-vehicle seating that is adjustable, safe, and comfortable in order to maximize the in-vehicle experience.

The Solution

The J.D. Power 2014 Seat Quality and Satisfaction StudySM provides analysis on vehicle owners’ experiences with the quality, design, and features of their automotive seating system. The study provides model-level information on specific seat and seat belt systems and includes data on every model sold in the United States. The information serves as a powerful benchmarking tool that allows suppliers and manufacturers to easily identify strengths and weaknesses. With analysis of both quality “things gone wrong” and design satisfaction “things gone right,” the Seat Quality and Satisfaction Study provides a useful tool for the development and marketing of automotive seating products as a vehicle component.

The Benefits

Study subscription provides access to the tools needed to gain a comprehensive, in-depth understanding of how your company is performing and to identify any areas needing improvement, including:

  • Resource Allocation: Direct limited R&D resources to those product attributes that contribute the most to satisfaction. Identify the seat attributes that drive customer needs and utilize them to define priorities for future product development
  • Engineering: Focus resources on specific competitive strengths and opportunities for improvement and leverage study findings to improve positioning via comparison to the highest performers. Utilize results to translate design/engineering specs into products that satisfy owners
  • Sales/Marketing: Promote quality and satisfaction performance, as well as demonstrate how product features meet owner needs, desires, and expectations
  • Product Sourcing: Study findings can be used to identify competitive performance