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Teen Drivers & Statistics and Safety Tips

Teen Drivers & Statistics and Safety Tips

By Jeff Youngs, December 31, 2011
It is a highly unfortunate fact that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in the United States. Statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) from 2009 show that an average of eight teens between the ages of 16 and 19 died each day from injuries sustained in car crashes. Teen driver safety is imperative to reducing these startling facts, and following a few simple tips is a good way to avoid danger.

Teenagers are at higher risk because they are newly licensed which means they often underestimate the gravity of dangerous situations and are unable to recognize hazards as they develop. The death rate among male teenage drivers is nearly twice that of their female counterparts, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A closer look at teen driving statistics reveals that young drivers are less likely to wear their seat belts. In fact, nearly 10 percent of high school students reported that they rarely or never wear seat belts, and they are more likely to mix driving and alcohol (nearly 25 percent of all drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 who died in a motor vehicle crash had blood alcohol concentrations over .08). Finally, teenage drivers are also more likely to crash at night (half of all teen deaths occur between 3:00 PM and midnight, with the most accidents on weekends).

The above statistics noted the use of seat belts, the avoidance of alcohol, and driving primarily during the day are three good teen driving safety tips.
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