This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Review our Privacy and Cookie Notice for more details. X

Automakers Reach Historic Agreement Regarding Automatic Emergency Braking

Automakers Reach Historic Agreement Regarding Automatic Emergency Braking

By Joseph Dobrian, March 18, 2016
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) have announced a commitment by 20 automakers, representing more than 99% of the U.S. automotive market, to make automatic emergency braking (AEB) a standard feature on virtually all new cars no later than Sept 1, 2022. The automakers that have immediately agreed to this deadline include Audi, BMW, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Honda, Hyundai, Jaguar Land Rover, Kia, Maserati, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi Motors, Nissan, Porsche, Subaru, Tesla, Toyota, Volkswagen, and Volvo. According to the NHTSA, this agreement will make AEB standard on new cars three years faster than could have been achieved through a formal regulatory process. The IIHS estimates that 28,000 crashes and 12,000 injuries will be prevented during those three years.

“It's an exciting time for vehicle safety,” said Anthony Fox, U.S. Secretary of Transportation. “By proactively making emergency braking systems standard equipment on their vehicles, these 20 automakers will help prevent thousands of crashes and save lives. It's a win for safety and a win for consumers.”

An AEB system kicks in when the driver isn’t reacting quickly enough to prevent a crash. The system uses on-vehicle sensors such as radar, cameras, and lasers to detect an imminent crash and applies the brakes.

The NHTSA and the IIHS jointly urged the automotive industry to make AEB a standard feature on all their light vehicles six months ago, in September 2015. Since that time, automakers have been ironing out the details and timetables for implementation. The agreement will make AEB standard on virtually all light-duty cars and trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 8,500 lbs. AEB will be standard on virtually all trucks with a GVWR between 8,501 lbs. and 10,000 lbs. beginning no later than Sept. 1, 2025. Consumer Reports will assist the NHTSA and IIHS in monitoring progress toward full compliance with the agreement. Meanwhile, the NHTSA plans to accelerate its research on more advanced AEB applications, including systems that reduce the risk of collisions with pedestrians.

Untitled Document

Subscribe to J.D. Power Cars Newsletter

* indicates required

View previous campaigns.


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement